Sesame Halvah Cookies

Halvah cookies (9)

My grandmother would have turned 91 last Saturday.  Since I couldn’t bring her a cake or call her and sing, I decided on a small act in her honor.  I bought some halvah – the sweet treat she always had in her fridge – and I heartily savored a few too many slices of it.  Dense with sesame sweetness, each bite brought me back to the kitchen of grandma’s house, where my sister and I spent many summer afternoons sipping iced tea, snacking on brie cheese, and nibbling on halvah: one of grandma’s most favorite indulgences.

Halvah cookies (1)

Made and spelled in various ways, halvah has ties to numerous regions.  For my grandma, halvah came through her Jewish background and was always the sesame kind, preferably marbled with chocolate. The day after her birthday this year, I found myself with plenty of extra halvah and a yearning to bake. I remembered a scrumptious recent post on a favorite blog of mine, where halvah had been imbedded into a nutty loaf cake — an utterly mouthwatering idea!  Inspired, I created my own halvah-laden treat: thumbprint-style cookies with a chunk of halvah as their filling.  Here is the recipe.

Sesame Halvah Cookies (makes 20)Halvah cookies (5)

  • 1.5 tablespoons sesame seeds
  • 1 cup flour
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • ½ teaspoon salt (omit if using salted butter)
  • ½ cup butter, softened to warm room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 3 ounces sesame halvah, cut into ½” cubes (about 20 cubes)
  • 3 ounces chopped dark chocolate or ½ cup chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 325 F.  Line a large baking sheet with parchment. Toast sesame seeds on the baking sheet for about 15 minutes or until fragrant and golden brown.  Transfer seeds to a bowl to cool.  Whisk the flour, sugar and salt together.  Add the butter and mix until an even dough forms (using damp, warm hands can be easiest).  Add the vanilla and knead until just incorporated.

Halvah cookies (14)Form dough into balls a little over 2 teaspoons each (about .6 ounce a piece), placing them at least 1.5” apart from one another on prepared baking sheet.  Push a cube of halvah firmly into the center of each cookie, bracing sides of dough and squeezing gently to hold the halvah in place.  Freeze cookie sheet for 20 to 30 minutes (they will still spread a bit when baked, but this will help them hold their shape).

Bake cookies for 20 minutes at 325 F.  They’ll be about 2″ in diameter with toasty edges. Remove from oven and let cool completely, setting in fridge or freezer to hasten cooling if desired.  Carefully melt the chocolate (a few 20 second stints in the microwave, stirring after each until just smooth will do).  Transfer chocolate to a pastry bag or plastic bag with its corner snipped.  Drizzle over cooled cookies a few at a time, immediately following with a sprinkle of toasted sesame seeds.  Let chocolate harden before eating (if you can wait).

Halvah cookies (10)

Surrounded with buttery shortbread dough and topped with rich chocolate, the decadence of halvah is truly celebrated in these one of a kind cookies.  A sprinkle of fragrant sesame matches perfectly with the sweet paste within, just as the crisp adornment pairs nicely with the crumble of the cookie. With their marvelous flavors inside and out, sesame halvah cookies would make grandma proud.  I only wish I could share them with her right now.

Halvah cookies (6)

Maybe next time… Though I haven’t tried it myself, I trust that these cookies would work well with almost any kind of halvah in their centers.  Moreover, the dough would taste great with a dash of ground spice (cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves or the like), and some fresh citrus zest such as orange could also be yummy.  For a more chocolatey cookie, replace ¼ cup flour with cocoa powder, and consider dunking the cookies in melted chocolate instead of drizzling them with it. Feel free to freeze the unbaked cookies in a sealed container up to 2 weeks before baking. Candy in a cookie — can it get any better?

Halvah cookies (4)Halvah cookies (2)Halvah cookies (13)Halvah cookies (12)Halvah cookies (7)

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Cookies & Bars, Sweets, Traditional with a Twist and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

18 Responses to Sesame Halvah Cookies

  1. Pingback: Hanukkah food: Rainbow latkes, dougnut holes and more creative recipes | Your News Resources

  2. Pingback: Creative Hanukkah Recipes

  3. katy says:

    As a lucky reader who got to sample these beauties, all I will say is that they were wonderful as usual! Long live halva(h) in baked goods! And I’m so glad that you got to celebrate your grandma’s birthday in whimsical style.

  4. What a wonderful tribute to your grandma – they look luscious and I am going to have to check out this halvah.

  5. Oh my goodness, those look heavenly! I love the nutty grittiness of halvah, and I have evr since I discovered it in my undergrad days through Russian. I love that you incorporated the chocolate on the top. These are beauty queen cookies, for sure! 🙂

  6. Erica says:

    That is such a very sweet and perfect thing for you to do: to create something like this cookie after your grandmother’s birthday in remembrance of a woman who meant so much to you. Plus, the cookies look delicious (like everything you make) and also beautiful, drizzled with chocolate like that, and sprinkled with sesame seeds. I wish you could share them with her right now too.

  7. mmmarzipan says:

    They really look fabulous! A lovely tribute to your grandma!

  8. Lovely idea, sure your grandmother would have loved them!

  9. Father Bill says:

    I be tasting dem cookies….. Another amazing creation from “The Queen of East Bay Sweets”

    Bless Florence ..

Please leave a comment:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s